Posted in Events

A Look Ahead … Schola Cantorum

Posted on January 24, 2019Edit”A Look Ahead … Quartets at the Folly”


STARRING: RICHARD KARN FROM THE SMASH HIT HOME IMPROVEMENT

To February 17 — Shear Madness at New Theatre Restaurant

SHEAR MADNESS is America’s most popular and longest running comedy (now in its 31st year at Washington D.C.’s prestigious Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts). More than 12 million people worldwide have seen the hilarious whodunit and there is no end in sight; its success just keeps going and going.

In this hilarious whodunit, a renowned classical pianist is murdered in her apartment above the SHEAR MADNESS beauty salon and you, the audience, along with Inspector Nick O’Brien, interrogate the suspects, evaluate the clues and solve the mystery. The wacky, spontaneous comedy never has the same ending twice, so you can see it again and again.

Insert personal review: Betsy and I enjoyed this show. The jokes are always fresh to the year and locale of the show — which meant I didn’t catch half of them due to the attempt and “Liberal” reparte. It also meant much greater use of**!=@#* than as necessary to get adequate Standup Comedian Cred. Nick O’Brien’s pictures in the promos are from his Home Improvement days. He looks much better than them, and also much more mature. His acting as very good, and not impeded by the same need for modern Comedy as the other actors.

The dinner menu was as good as always, but we had a maitre ‘d encourage 10 people to cut ahead of us in line “because no one saw that line”. They have four buffet lines but only three obvious lanes to them on each side of the theatre, so the middle lane usually serves as feeder for 2 and splits as it comes up. They need to mark clear lanes on the floor if they want four lanes to speed up traffic.

Friday, February1, — he BACH ARIA SOLOISTS 7:30 p.m. at 1900 Building

They are Honoring Women composers in a concert where Hannah Collins will be guest ‘cellist with the Soloists.

Sunday, Feb. 3 — Annual Super Bowl organ recital at 2:30 p.m.Community of Christ Auditorium, Independence.

JAN KRAYBILL will play her customary imaginative program with her usual brilliance.  The recital will be over in plenty of time for the Super Bowl.

Monday Feb. 4 —  Kansas City Musical Club monthly meeting and program, noon, Asbury United Methodist Church.

Featured artists are Janet Fetterman and Elizabeth Grace playing music for one piano, four hands; the second half of the program features Eman Chalshotori and Melody Stroth playing music for ‘cello and piano.  A reception follows the program.

Tuesday, Feb. 5 — Schola Cantorum – 7 p.m. St. Andrews Episcopal Church.

SCHOLA CANTORUM, the American Guild of Organists’ Choral Ensemble, will perform under guest conductor  Jackson Thomas, conductor of KC VITAs. He has chosen music by Palestrina, Daniel Elder, and the Requiem by Joseph Rheinberger. 

Tuesday, Feb. 5 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, Feb. 12 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, Feb. 19 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

February  20-April 2019– Biloxi Blues at New Theatre Restaurant

The laughter rarely stops in this Tony Award-winning “Best Play” that tells the story of Eugene Jerome and his experiences as a 19-year-old draftee who, with a handful of other recruits must endure ten weeks of boot camp and a tough as nails, hard-drinking platoon leader in the steaming swamps of Biloxi, Mississippi in 1943.

Tuesday, Feb. 26 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, March 5 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, March 12 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, March 19 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, March 26 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, April 2 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday, April 9 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

Tuesday April 23 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

April 25-July 7 — The Buddy Holly Story at New Theatre Restaurant

It’s Back! One of our most popular productions of all time! BUDDY-THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY. This joyous musical tells the story of Buddy Holly’s short yet explosive career and features his classical hits: PEGGY SUE, THAT’LL BE THE DAY, NOT FADE AWAY, OH BOY, MAYBE BABY, RAVEON and many more. This show Rocks!

Tuesday, April 30 — Songflower Chorale Rehearsal 7-9:30 p.m., choral room of St. Joseph Catholic Church, 11311 Johnson Dr, Shawnee Mission, KS 66203.

This is a closed rehearsal in preparation for the May 12 concert Madrigals Meet Jazz but interested musicians are encouraged to contact director Geoff Wilcken.

May 12 at 3 p.m. in Historic St. Mary’s Episcopal Church — Madrigals Meet Jazz concert by the Songflower Chorale (Yes, this mother’s day — bring mom.)

The flowering of music we know as Renaissance Madrigals is notable for several new features. They were the first major musical genre not to be connected by any strings to the Church. Indeed, these compact songs of love, nature, worldly adventures, social commentary, and play were the first important body of music that could be called “popular”— the ancestors of Romantic Lieder, modern commercial music, and the widely-known songs which became the grist for the music we know as jazz. In this program, well-loved English madrigals are brought into contact with some of their counterparts from the world of jazz, from the swinging ballroom tunes of Count Basie and Duke Ellington to the brilliance of Charlie Parker and the trenchant commentary of Charles Mingus. We will hear vocal and choral jazz as well as instrumental, backed by some of Kansas City’s most outstanding musicians.

July -Sept. 15 — Joseph and the Amazing TechniColor Dreamcoat at New Theatre Restaurant

Based on the “Coat of Many Colors” story from The Bible’s Book of Genesis, this upbeat musical is filled with a cornucopia of musical styles. From country-western to calypso to bubblegum pop & rock ‘n’ roll, this Old Testament tale emerges both timely and timeless. With its family-friendly storyline, universal themes and catchy music, JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT is a musical theatre event not to be missed. From the composer of PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, EVITA, CATS AND SCHOOL OF ROCK.@

Posted in Music

#319: I Would Be True

(Part of a series singing through the hymnbook I grew up with: Great Hymns of the Faith)

1

I would be true, for there are those who trust me;

I would be pure, for there are those who care;

I would be strong, for there is much to suffer,

I would be brave, for there is much to dare —

I would be brave, for there is much to dare.

2

I would be friend, ,of all — the foe, the friendless;

I would be giving, and forget the gift.

I would be humble, for I know my weakness;

I would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift —

I would look up, and laugh and love, and lift.

3

I would be prayerful thru each busy moment;

I would be be constantly in touch with God.

I would be tuned to hear His slightest whisper;

I would have faith to keep the path Christ trod —

I would have faith to keep the path Christ trod.

Posted in reading

The Swift Précis – First Installment

The Swift Précis Is a Tuesday feature where I choose what I found the most interesting reading during the past week and piece it together for your browsing pleasure. Most of it will be from blogs and other internet offerings — with appropriate links. But when I choose something in print, I will reference that as best I can too, for you to look up and follow if you so choose.

Today is the first time I will be doing this “best of the week/net” feature, and as I am currently behind on my reading, some of the items may be from “dated” internet postings that are still worth your look, if you haven’t already discovered them. Presumably I will be more up-to-date as the weeks go on, but, hey, being up-to-date is really over-rated, you know… especially with things that stand the test of time.

One of my favorite bloggers is Cedar Sanderson — I once said that should could make watching grass grow exciting — In the below blog she has an excellent comment on the benefits of being a moderate, and specifically moderation:

I recommend you read it, along, of course, with my own comments on moderation.

Another blog that I enjoy a lot is According to Hoyt. During a recent guest post, Alma Boykin raised the question: Do you Kipple?

This, and especially its comments, is a good discussion of the influence of author Rudyard Kipling on people today, especially since he has fallen from favor in many of the more “literary” circles. My own contrariness is seen in the comments, where I discuss G.K. Chesterton’s issues with Kipling’s philosophy — not his literary merit.

Going back to Cedar Sanderson, following in the wake of the razor ad fiasco, she wrote an interesting piece on what women want in a real man. I didn’t post any comment on this one

And finally, a fourth and last recommend for this week, back to According to Hoyt, this time a post by Sarah herself, on the various gradations of crazy:

A culture can survive and absorb a lot of different levels of crazy, but there are some types that are ultimately toxic to the culture itself, and she suggests how to recognize these and their dangers, and poses some important thoughts about what an individual can do about them. No comments from me here, except to you — Go read it!

Posted in health

Don’t Deny the Visit

(This is the weekly focus on Health: The Whole Person. I take whatever part or parts of the whole person that I choose to focus on, including fitness, diet, social relations, the medical professions, etc.)

Yesterday in Sunday School at Avondale United Methodist Church my class went through a “Caring Conversations: Making Your Healthcare Wishes Known” booklet. It was a very appropriate topic of discussion, and I will only briefly comment on it today as a jumping off point for several other health-related items that I want to discuss all-too-briefly today.

After the class discussion I found myself last night carried back to my 12-year-old self. The first of my grandparents was facing the end-of-life stage and I was asking to see my maternal grandmother. She was in the end stages of severe colon cancer which had come upon us all suddenly. Despite being the part of the family that always did all the right health things, got all the annual checkups and exams, they had not caught her cancer until it was too late, and she passed all too suddenly from us. I never did get to see her that last time. They had waited to let me see her until they thought she would have a better moment that she never did get, and she was gone.

I also found myself flashed to a moment in my recent past. For the past decade I have been attending AUMC, and for most of it I have been one of two key Basses in the AUMC choir. Though A tenor by natural part, I have assisted the balance by singing with the one steady bass they had, A glorious, resonant singer and excellent Christian gentleman named Jim Prather. Over the decade of singing with him, I got to know him in the limited ways that you do singing with someone, and worshipping with him. But I can to respect and enjoy him, sort of as a surrogate father, especially as this was after the passing of my own father.

A few months ago we were warming up before service to sing and Jim didn’t show up. During service we found out that he had fallen on the steps of the church, hit his head, and been taken to the hospital. In the days that followed we were told to not visit but give him the chance and energy to recover at the hospital. He did have some better days, and then passed away. I never got a chance to see or visit him again.

I know it was most important for the family to get to see him. But going through the care decisions yesterday I found myself whipped into my own mourning about Jim Prather, and the hurt I still feel at his absence on Wednesday night choir rehearsals as the only bass without him there.

And I want everyone to know, never ever, in my future care, deny someone who wants to come visit me the opportunity to do so. Not that I expect there will be any sort of flood of people at the hospital wanting to visit me at any time. But anyone who does should be allowed to visit. Their time might need to be limited for medical reasons, but they must all be given the chance to visit. I don’t want anyone to have the feelings I do about not getting to see me, as I still feel so poignantly in the above two cases.

Posted in Music

#318: I Need Thee Every Hour

(Part of a series singing through the hymnbook I grew up with: Great Hymns of the Faith)

1

I need Thee ev’ry hour, Most Gracious Lord;

No tender voice like Thine Can peace afford.

CHORUS

I need Thee, O I need Thee,

Ev’ry hour I need Thee!

O bless me now, my Savior —

I come to Thee!

2

I need Thee ev’ry hour, Stay Thou near by;

Temptations lose their pow’r When Thou art nigh.

CHORUS

3

I need Thee ev’ry hour, In joy or pain;

Come quickly and abide, Or life is vain.

CHORUS

4

I need Thee ev’ry hour, Most Holy One:

O Make me Thine indeed, Thou blessed Son!

CHORUS

Posted in Family, Social Issues

l’chaim

Greetings! Those of you who have followed this blog, for various reasons, may have seen the post I did in March 2018 when I edited my regular schedule for the postings on various days of the week. You may also have noticed that my daily posting fell apart this past year due to the irregularities of my life and health. On March 1, 2108 I announced the start of my Sabbatical. With the beginning of 2019 I have determined that sabbatical to be over and as of tomorrow will be starting a new and slightly revised blog schedule.

One change is that on Mondays I will no longer be writing about fitness, but health, which can mean fitness, but touch a lot of other subjects, mostly personal but also linking to whatever level of health I choose to make it.

But the biggest change is going to be on Tuesdays. The day is going to be a review of items of interest I found in blogs and other places on the internet over the past week.

  • Sunday: Great Hymns of the Faith — I am working my way through the hymn book of my childhood. I put up the text, and record and mp3 of me playing and singing (sometimes with other family members) the hymn.
  • Monday: Health — Discussion of health and fitness topics related to my own personal journey or observations I make about health issues around me.
  • Tuesday: The Swift Précis – Bits of Blogs and Items of Note from the Internet.
  • Wednesday: Great Hymns of the Faith — Another installment of the series I mentioned on Sunday
  • Thursday: A Look Ahead. –– A list of interesting events going on and coming up that I know of and may be involved in.
  • Friday: A Blast of the Past — Putting up pictures from the family photo albums, with reflections on them and my file.
  • Saturday: Reflections — The open mic day to comment on any topic I choose to, from any field. A combination editorial/essay/apologietics piece.

But today, of course, is Saturday, which makes it a reflection day. The past year was to be a sabbatical between one job and another, between one career and another. But by now I have decided I have had enough of careers. What I have wanted is a life. Careers have blocked my life, have segmented me into ways that others want things.

This past year has not gone precisely the way I would have chosen. There are a lot of things I would rather had not happened. Yet I am glad that I had this past year, to actually have a life.

There have been struggles getting my two offspring launched into their lives, and I hope they find lives, and not careers. There was the time I was dangerously close to making the same mistake, in seeing a workplace as a career/life, but Worlds of Fun quickly disabused my mistaking them for a family or a life — while I enjoyed my experience there overall, Shelby that one day made it very clear to me that Worlds of Fun is just a job. One just has to buck it up and do what one needs to. I hated what she did that day and thank her for it.

So I am no longer searching for a career. I will work, and have jobs, but the need to have a long-term job is no longer of importance to me. Having a life is.

2018 was also the year I almost died. People didn’t take me seriously when I said that, and I don’t think they do even now. I keep getting asked if I am alright. The answer is NO, I am not alright. I am still having issues that the medical profession will not take seriously, and keeps deflecting into other areas instead of paying attention to the things I need to tell them. I am not even sure that my family always takes me seriously in the times and ways that I insist are needed. But that, ultimately, is life. You aren’t taken seriously unless you fit within the framework of what people expect.

Well, I am not in the framework of what people expect, and I am going to continue to not be in that framework, and people are going to continue to not take me seriously.

And I am going to continue to have a life, instead of a career, instead of a straight jacket.

l’chaim